Simply Bulky Woven Wall Hanging Pattern

Being a seeker of modern yarn crafting tools and supplies, we immediately fell head over heels Jenny’s (owner of Sonora Handmade) acrylic lap looms and weaving tools when we first caught eyes on them. Her looms are the epitome of koelness, which comes in so many fun colors (including our favourite: the hot pink!). Apart from being a fan of her tools, we are all praise for Jenny’s clever use of rovings in her work. So of course, we couldn’t let this koel kid off without having her contribute a DIY weaving pattern. This Simple Bulky Woven Wall Hanging is perfect for beginners who are interested in experimenting with bulkier yarns. So give it a try and share with us your creations by tagging @koelmagazine on Instagram!

Yarns Used
2oz. Ashland Bay Cream merino wool roving
1oz. Ashland Bay Vanilla merino wool roving
1oz. Ashland Bay Citron merino wool roving
1oz. Ashland Bay Pewter merino wool roving
1 skein of bulky cream merino wool yarn
1 small skein of black wool yarn, worsted weight

Tools & Materials
16 x 20cm framed weaving loom or larger
Scissors
Weaving needle
Tapestry needle
Acrylic rod or branch

Instructions
Begin:
Double warp the loom using black wool yarn. You should have 44 warp threads in total. This pattern is done using three basic weaving techniques: tabby weave, soumak weave and rya knots. For the chunky roving, you will have to decrease the length of your soumak weave stitch with each color, for a “stair – stepped” look.

Continue:
Step 1: After you have warped your loom, prepare your weaving needle with the bulky cream merino wool yarn and tabby weave 13 rows.

Step 2: Using Cream Roving, soumak weave 4 rows. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Begin at the left of your loom, and soumak weave to the right, and return back to the left where you started. Complete this weave and return, twice. This should give you four rows of soumak when done.

Step 3: Using the Citron Roving, begin at the left of the loom and complete one partial row of soumak weave, until you reach the 34th vertical warp thread. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Return back to the left again with the soumak weave.

Step 4: Using the Pewter Roving, begin at the left of the loom and complete one partial row of soumak weave, until you reach the 30th vertical warp thread. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Return back to the left again with the soumak weave.

Step 5: Using the Vanilla Roving, begin at the left of the loom and complete one partial row of soumak weave, until you reach the 22nd vertical warp thread. The soumak stitch should be done over two warp threads, which will give the soumak weave a bulky look. Return back to the left again with the soumak weave.

Step 6: Fill the remaining weave with tabby weave for the entire piece. Begin just under the Cream Roving, and continue to horizontally add rows until you have filled in all the space next to the soumak roving. Continue to tabby weave an additional 32 horizontal rows, which will give approximately another 6 inches of length to your piece.

Step 7: Using the remaining bulky cream merino wool yarn, cut 66 pieces of yarn of approximately 30 inches in length each. Using three strands of yarn for each knot, tie 22 rya knots across the bottom of the piece.

Step 8: Tabby weave three rows underneath the rya knots for stability.

End: Cut and tie the warp together in groups of two across the bottom and top of the weave. Tuck the ends into the back of the weaving. Using the bulky cream merino wool yarn, secure the weaving to a rod or branch of your choice.

A Little About Jennifer Clark
Jenny is a passionate weaver based in sunny Scottsdale, Arizona. She launched Sonora Handmade in 2015, named after the birth of her daughter, Sonora. Sonora Handmade stocks modern weaving looms and tools, including Jenny’s signature acrylic lap looms designed and laser cut by her. She also teaches lap loom weaving workshops throughout Arizona for adults and children.

Follow Jennifer Clark: Instagram


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